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? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america, and around the globe. inflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military -- conflicting messages from the obama administration about a possible military intervention in syria. in muted remarks, the president insisted no decision had been made, and any action would be limited and narrow. is america going to attack the assad regime, and when? mark mardell starts our coverage. in a damascus suburb, witnessed second hand by the whole world is a challenge for america and its presid
this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years,and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers work hard to understand the industry you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. we offer expertise and tailored solutions in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? and now, bbc "world news america." washington, from i'm kathy k. the obama administration makes the case, action against the syrian regime. >> the united states government 1429nows that at least syrians were killed in this attack. >> the president himself says he has not made up his mind, and any u.s. response to the chemical attacks will be limited. >> we are not considering any open-ended commitments, any boots on the ground approach. >> saying goodbye to seamus mosty, one of the world's treasured poets, has died at the age of 74. >> welcome to
called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i think this is the number one sold on amazon.com and it is riveting to show how does organization has managed to infiltrate into various capitals throughout the western world and it has managed to come under the obama administration, metastasize and so without any further ado i would like to introduce you to a wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank you for hosting this event. i look at sera as a modern-day esther or deborah. such a time as this. thank you for having me here. if you write a book, you spend a year with that and say this book can put me through pack. but i think that people are reading it. it gets into detail about the main player in the arab spring, which i refers to as the islamist winter in the butt. the muslim brotherhood is done, out of power in egypt, we don't have to worry about them. this is the postmortem of history. it has been has the muslim brotherhood, the leaders were killed and imprisoned in the group was banned for decades. the headquarters was burned to the ground. c
claude mckay, fats waller, duke ellington. america experienced and said, we like the style of these people. they enjoyed it, adopted it, integrated it. and exploited it. the popularity of black style and culture soon spread throughout the country. it was not enough for black folks to be artistically admired. black folks wanted and demanded full participation in the social, political, and economic life of american society. that attitude set the stage for the civil rights movement of the 1950's and 1960's. on wednesday, august 28, 1963, 300,000 people -- 80% of them black -- marched on the nation's capital as did before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come -- and stood before this lincoln memorial, declaring that the time for radical change had come. celebrating the past is good. but without a vision for the future, we will never move beyond that past. in 2008, america was ready for an intelligent and articulate black man to sit in the oval office. he brought not only his intelligence, but some swagger into the white house. the reality is
syria. >> translator: >> this is part of america's plan to divide the middle east it started with iraq and now syria and this is an israel's interest. tra*p>> translator: it happenedn iraq and maybe in syria and maybe egypt. >> reporter: the syrian government promised to defend themself against attack. the fire in syria won't stop at its borders. al jazeera, beirut. >> the tinspection team in syria could take two weeks to release its report but the u.s. will wait on findings -- will it wait on findings before launching any attack. james is at the u.n. the ambassadors of the five members of the security council on their way to a meeting. this wasn't a formal session along the horseshoe table the final court of international security. the place where historically so many decision about global war and peace have been taken. instead, the last of the arrive at a meeting of the u.s. secretary general with the ambassador of the country will take security council. the weapons inspectors have made good progress taking samples of witness statements inside syria at the sight of the chemical attac
of justice flickered. it never died. because they kept marching, america changed. because they marched, the civil rights law was passed. because they marched, the voting rights law was assigned. because they marched, doors of opportunity in education swung open so their daughters and sons could imagine a life for themselves beyond washing someone else's laundry or shining someone else's shoes. because they marched, city councils changed and state legislatures changed and congress changed. eventually the white house changed. [cheers and applause] because they marched, america became more free and more fair. not just for african-americans, but for women and latinos. asians and native americans. catholics, jews, and muslims. for gays, for americans with disabilities. america changed for you and for me. the entire world drew strength from that example, whether it be young people who watched from the other side of an iron curtain and would eventually tear down that wall, or the young people inside south africa would eventually end the scourge of apartheid. [cheers and applause] those are th
." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington, i am katty kay. says that if his country is attacked he will defend himself. if this happens, what kind of effect may this have? >> the horrific aftermath of an attack carried out allegedly by the syrian government using an incendiary bomb. we have this exclusive report. cuba is back in the ring after banning professional boxing for half a century. the punching is flying once again. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the globe. in washington, new york and london, there have been a series of tense meetings on syria. presidentt jet -- obama has briefed john boehner, and david cameron is talking to parliament. russia has called a meeting of the security council. no decision has been made but with a threat looming, president assad says that syria will defend itself. the syrian people are increasingly nervous as we report from damascus. it feels as if something big is coming to damascus. the supporters of president assad paraded on the hotel, outside of the where the u.n. inspectors and foreign c
the way he saw america's potential relationship with all these middle east countries the word is reciprocity. he believed these countries should receive something in return. it wasn't good enough for the united states to function like a european colonial power and extract the resources of these countries and those countries receive nothing in return. this was alarming and disturbing to winston churchill and the british because the british had behaved in the middle east in a way that was exclusively extracted without those countries receiving much. occasionally a small number of countries receive something in return but president roosevelt had a more universal idea of reciprocity. look at saudi arabia. in saudi arabia the american oil companies were at that time by and large dividing the proceeds of the oil extraction 50/50. this was not occurring with the oil company in iran or the iraqi petroleum company which was largely dominated by the british in iraq so the british fought the american involvement in the middle east if the americans were going to use saudi arabia as a mode
joining forces, we are so proud of the work you've done to help rally america around military families and veterans. i'm inspired by what they're doing, so thank you, michelle, for your extraordinary work. join at was proud to your convention three years ago. [applause] it is wonderful to be back. i want to thank your national much.der, thank you so teame entire leadership johnson, burgess, don adams, all the incredible spouses and spouses that the dav auxiliary. i want to thank barry janowski. i got it. [laughter] they used to mispronounce obama, too. [laughter] i want to thank barry and your grade team in washington. disabled american veterans, like all veterans, you carry in your hearts the story of brave service that took you to every as young men earth , leftmen, you left home everyone you ever knew because clouds gathered far across the sea. you had your whole life ahead of you, but you were willing to risk all of it for this land that we love. because you know from hard experience what we must never our country and doors because in every generation there are americans like you w
and put a platform together that focuses on them. not everybody in america wants a business and money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work in community groups. spend time at their church. we, as republicans, believe that is a good thing. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an agenda of ideas to raise up folks who want to vote for us. you saw the last election. they did not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. the second thing is we need to talk less about the culture. he people who do this is those who do not want to talk about culture in the first place. as a result, do not engage as we have in this party. i will give you an exa
, but also america's core self interests. >> the army major convicted of killing 13 people at fort hood in texas has been sentenced to die. nadal hassan was sentenced earlier today. that sentence will be automatically appealed. >> on the 50th anniversary of martin luther king's "i have a dream" speech, thousands gathered in washington, d.c. again. former presidents, celebrities and every day americans were there. >> near two weeks, firefighters are till fighting that fire out in california. we'll have the latest news coming up at 11:00 here on aljazeera. ♪ theme ♪ theme >> as the u.s. may be drawing closinger to intervention in syria polls vin to show a large majority of americans oppose military action. how can the u.s. build an international coalition when its leaders can't build one here at home? also, twitter, google and "the new york times" websites suffer cyber attacks. a group connected to the syrian government is the likely culprit. how vulnerable is america's cyber infra structure to another attack. >> the women who worked side by side with the men during the civil movement
. -- andrybody in america money is everything to them. a lot of folks want to spend time with their families. work and community groups. spend time at their church. we as republicans believe that is a good inc.. we do not talk about it. and we do not talk to them. -- that is a good thing. it is to take a page out of our book and start putting forth an upnda of ideas to raise folks who want to vote for us. you side and the last election. they do not want to vote for president obama. but at least he went and talked to them and about them. we did not do that. we marginalized them. --st and foremost, we need first and foremost, we need to reject the idea that if we build to becoming, everybody will be fine. -- if we build the economy, everybody will be fine. most people have holes in their boats. we need to talk about people who have holes in their boats. we all do. we all need help from each other. [applause] the second inc. as we be to talk less about the culture area -- thing is we need to talk less about the culture. the people who do this is who do not want to talk about culture in the firs
america." >> this is "bbc world news america." thatay after the clashes killed more than 600 people in egypt, president obama condemned the violence but cut short of cutting off aid. >> our traditional cooperation cannot continue as usual when civilians are being killed in the streets. >> a car bomb rips through a suburb of beirut, killing 18 people and a stronghold of hezbollah. revealed species was to the world today. actually it has been hiding in plain sight. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and around the globe. egypt's capital city has been the scene of morning, anger, and unrest after the clashes between security forces and supporters that -- of mohamed morsi. more than 600 people have died and their opponents say the number is higher. tonight the un security council is getting an emergency briefing. jeremy bowen reports from cairo on the days events. the setsrought ice up of the mops because in cairo, dead bodies decompose sought -- quickly. inside there were 200 in trouts, surrounded by their families. they blame the army commander. this is my brother,
>> this is "bbc world news america." funding of this presentation is made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, giving all profits to charity and pursuing the common good for over 30 years, and union bank. >> at union bank, our relationship managers use their -- work hard to understand the industry that you operate in, working to nurture new ventures and provide capital for key strategic decisions. solutionsxpertise and in a wide range of industries. what can we do for you? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> this is bbc world news america, reporting from washington, i am katty kay. says that if his country is attacked he will defend himself. if this happens, what kind of effect may this have? >> the horrific aftermath of an attack carried out allegedly by the syrian government using an incendiary bomb. we have this exclusive report. cuba is back in the ring after banning professional boxing for half a century. the punching is flying once again. >> welcome to our viewers on public television in america and across the gl
coverage of what is happening in the world as well as what is happening in america. from here is a call next alabama. welcome. walter, are you there? you're on the air. i had a brother served in vietnam. realize like going into a rack them of the women, and putting our boys over there and women and the people here were calling in criticizing. if they would take a gun and do something like that, it is different. if it were not for our armed forces, we would be controlled by other countries. just like in the united states, these folk who rob banks or stuff and this that going on all the time. ain't none of us perfect, but i think our soldiers are doing a good job. media,o you think the the usb then, does a good job of covering our efforts in afghanistan and before that to my iraq? host: i sure do. i sure do.ler: host: go ahead. i am a former korean, vietnam veteran, and to make -- to me, the meeting is you have two efferent sides of the story from different angles. i tend to go to the foreign media to see what they think of us. at the same time, i think the lady talked about looking at wh
is elected with the duty to protect the national security interest of the united states of america and the decision he makes about the decisions that he makes about our foreign policy is with our national security interest front and center. >> now, the white house national security staff put out a statement this evening saying the president will continue to consult with u.s. allies but there is no mention the u.s. will go along with international partners. the next step comes when administration releases it's intelligence report on the chemical weapons attack to the public. the white house has hinted the president may make another statement on syria and presumably a window for action opens up this weekend when u.n. inspectors are scheduled to leave syria, but the u.s. appears to be ready to move before any further action at the ump u.n. they want to send a signal not just to syria but the world about the use of chemical weapons, piers. >> thanks very much, indeed. joining me now is senator john mccain. senator, thank you for joining me. why are you so credit kill of the president's
at where america lost its way could use this town as a primary source. go to cnn.com/fareed for a link to my "washington post" column this week, and let's get started. >>> when the rungs on the ladder of opportunity grow farther and farther apart, it undermines the very essence of america. that idea that if you work hard, you can make it here. >> that was president obama last week. in fact one thing that both right and left agree on is that social and economic mobility, bowing able to make it no matter where you start from, is at the heart of the american dream. in recent years the most depressing statistics about this country have been that that mobility has declined, particularly compared with other countries, despite the anecdotes and celebrated examples, most americans appear to be stuck in the economic strata into which they were born. last week the most detailed study on this topic was released. it provides lots of fascinating clo clues about the causes of our problem, breaking american mobility down by geography. for example, if you were born in a detroit family in the bottom fi
. >> this international form cannot be violated without consequences. >> america's toughening position as secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is now all but certain syria has resorted to using chemical weapons. >> new dangers as the nation's biggest forest fire now threatens thousands of buildings, water and energy sources and america's cherished trees. >> a senior muslim brotherhood leader accusing the military run government there are terrorism. >> the secret service agent grabbed her hand and the gun. >> this chilling flashback as former president gerald ford recounts an assassination attempt on his life 30 years ago. ♪ theme >> syria's foreign minister says a potential u.s. strike on syria would serve the interest of groups there in response to a chemical weapons attack that killed 355 people last week in damascus. in a speech moments ago, assad's second in command telling secretary of state john kerr we his regime has not gone against the u.n. investigation. >> it has said that the government used a chemical agent. i categorically deny to mr. kerry, i reiterate there is no single cou
, this point in time for america to start to lead -- this president to lead. to come before congress and get the approval of congress to do this, he should be able to make this case, i think if he tries to make it, he'll get the boot from congress. >> thank you for being with us. appreciate it, joining me with reaction to this developing story. ann coulter is with us. two big questions i have here. if they're not going for regime change, we have two big questions before us, number one, we have the israelis. now, if iran and syria are saying if they get a cruise missile attack, they're going to attack israel. is the president prepared to defend them? >> no. >> and number two. >> let's start with that one. >> wait a minute. we have to consider that. and what's the point then of lobbying missiles -- >> it's very depressing talking about foreign policy, whenever a democrat is president, because they don't care about america's national intraspective. that should be the only concern the man makes -- by the way, i don't think the president does have to go to congress to bomb someone. he's the comma
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promised to resolve the crisis, and centered this clip from america's got talent, while she shopped online for pricey jewelry and furniture. the president has assisted he has had popular support. he says he is trying to protect his country and his people. but critics say he only wants to protect his own power. >> so how did he go from a westernized eye doctor to becoming the president of syria using chemical weapons to massacre his own people. i appreciate you both being here. you interbothed bashar and his father -- >> yes, i did. >> what is your impression of this man? >> i interviewed him very early in his term as president. and he was an unknown. whereas his father had been really ruthless, but he was tough, ruthless, clever, and the son was an unknown quantity. >> despite his western leanings because he had been in london for so long -- >> yes, and i think there were some hopes that syria could be broken off from iran at that point, strategically. >> and ed this is not a guy who resembled your saddam hussein and gadhafis. how he has turned out to be very similar to those guys. >> he i
. are what the latest polls. a small percentage want their president to act, but about 60% say america should not stay away -- i mean, it should stay away civil war in syria. but there is a statement that obama should do more for the rebels then just send them on, while almost 80%, i should say 90% to not want america to help the opposition. meanwhile, the medical charity doctors without borders say they received more than 3000 patients suffering when the chemical assault happened. 350 people died, but who was behind the attack is still hard to verify. this is the rebel group saying they have got their largest shipment of weapons in the past three days, with the u.s. military buildup in the region. one man says this is not a coincidence. >> we have to see these elements as connected, as related to each other, as a strategy to try to reverse the course that the war has taken, where the government has made very significant gains, and to try to stifle the effort to bring down the independent government of syria. there are a lot of weapons out there in the world. there are rebel groups at this po
america and against our interests. the president is committed to strengthening these programs. he has put forth ideas to strengthen these organs. he is following through on promises of reforms. i terms of specific reports, am not in a position to comment on it because i have not read it. >> is the white house aware of out?toruy coming were you guys aware, and i'm curious if you have concerns about this kind of information being out, or are you comfortable -- >> it is hard for me to a comment on the information in the report. i did not talk to the journalist or can on the story, so i'm not a position to comment on that information. we have talked about our concerns about the damaging leak of classified information, but i am not sure whether or not that applies here because i have not read the story. times talked a couple about the global community being in agreement now on chemical weapons in syria. consensus will strengthen over the next few days, or is it already at a point where the president feels he has international mandate? new -- we consider will continue our consultations with i l
standards in journalism. >> a new voice of journalism in the u.s., al jazeera america. america. >> we tell the human store ri from around the block, across the country. >> if joe can't find work, his family will go from living in a hotel to living in their car. >> connected, inspired, bold. >> bob filner has resigned at mayor of san diego. he spent his last two months fighting a growing list have sexual harassment allegations. the san diego city council accepted his resignation this afternoon. he will officially step down august 30. he said goodbye to san diego, and apologized for letting the city down. >> obviously this is not a happy time for any of us, not for the city of san diego, not for those who represent and for my own part in causing all this, i offer deep apology certainly to all the citizens of san diego and through you to the citizens that you represent. the city should not have been put through this, and my own personal failures were responsible, and i apologize to the city. >> stephanie stanton joins us live from san diego. he apologized, but he didn't admit bob filner did r
the one, fighting to be a part of america, and you see fearlessness in almost every state if you look. >> you were inspired because of what happened with trayvon martin? is that one of the reasons that somebody from their generation has become -- he was mentioned three our fortimes in different speeches, excluding by dr. king's sister. >> it was an alarm cloic for a lot of young people. then for the verdict to not go the way we had expected or plan i think set off a lot of young even. all i have to do is look around, but i do think that having someone that was our generation that looked just like us taken out of, you have the case of israel hernandez in miami, an artist just graffiti'ing an abandoned mcdonald's taken out. young people are starting to observe that hey, possibly the america we have today isn't the one we want tomorrow. >> interesting in 1963, obviously it was a lot of young people that came out that was the 8th anniversary of emmett till's slaying, but i have to play you this. at the end of the '63 march, they listed ten demands of things that they thought were importan
almost quite obviously referred to in that interview, if america's core national interests are at stake? >> let me go to paul, who is in capitol hill, and paul, of course, many members of congress back home on recess that's why they have this conference call, have you heard anything tonight? >> well, that's right. there is mounting frustration what we are hearing. mounting bipartisan frustration, they are worried that any attack can draw the u.s. further into the syrian conflict. and they are also frustrated about the lack of an end game. about a clear policy for a way out. >> paul, do we know anything about the briefing at the white house that they had with congress? have you hear anything about that. >> they have heard there are problems with that video conference. a problem securing enough video conference lines so the conference had to be declassified on ur classified report. president obama said it wouldn't be regime change or even changes the civil war. they are trying to keep it out of the hands of terrorists. >> we know the ashad regime maintains stock piles. we have indicated o
to as the forgotten war. because most all of the world knew about the importance of america being involved in saving emocracy in world war ii and vietnam. good or bad, people knew people that went there. but somehow in the middle of that, no one really missed us or knew where korea was or didn't appear that there was too much concern. d when we did return, unlike the vietnam veterans who really unfairly had been treated so unkind, fortunately for us, we were never missed except by our family and friends, people never they here we were and to us. weren't as kind veterans turned out from all over. comrades that were part of the 20 countries that were part of the united nations. and when north koreans invaded south korea, those of us who were called to go to south korea to defend them, we were going to a country that we never knew to fight for a people that we never met, for causes that were not well known. having said all of that, at the conclusion, and the war has never really been called a war, it still is a division between these people, but as a result of the united states and united nations' effo
. >>> later, made in america, a label that's been disappearing lately, but a new movie is highlighting companies that are keeping jobs right here in the united states. i'll talk with the film's director. >>> about next i'm taking your questions on "ask ed live" my favorite segment coming up. i think farmers care more about the land than probably anyone else. we've had this farm for 30 years. we raise black and red angus cattle. we also produce natural gas. that's how we make our living and that's how we can pass the land and water back to future generations. people should make up their own mind what's best for them. all i can say is it has worked well for us. she loves a lot of it's what you love about her. but your erectile dysfunction - that could be a question of blood flow. cialis tadalafil for daily use helps you be ready anytime the moment's right. you can be more confident in your ability to be ready. and the same cialis is the only daily ed tablet approved to treat ed and symptoms of bph, like needing to go frequently or urgently. tell your doctor about all your medical conditi
solutions in a wide range of industries. hat can we do for you? >> and now, bbc world news, america. >> this is bbc world news america reporting from washington. 19 of america's diplomatic posts will remain closed until the end of the week in response to a terror threat from al qaeda. >> we take the threat very seriously and have taken action because of that. >> protests in turkey after more than 200 are found guilty of trying to overthrow the government including the country's former army chief. and would you eat a hamburger made in the lab? . a breakthrough to everyone's astes. >> welcome to our views on public television in america and also around the globe. after shattering 21 diplomatic posts across the islamic world this weekend due to increased chatter about a possible al qaeda attack the united states has decided to keep 19 of them closed until the end of the week. only the embassies in iraq and afghanistan will reopen. today white house spokesman jay carney said the obama administration decided to take the steps out of an abundance of caution. >> we take the threat very ser
are the headlines america tonight is next, i will see you back here at 11:00 eastern, and you can always find us on al jazeera.com. on america tonight. >> the nos have it. the nos have it. >> a raucous no vote in the british house of common moves president obama closer to a tough decision. will the u.s. go it alone? also tonight, a tough sell. is this the right time to buy real estate in bankrupt detroit? and the rebuilding of new orleans, the battle over who longs in the new new orleans. good evening, thank you for being with us. it was an absolutely gob smacker of a vote. one that quickly reverberate here in washington, and one that may force the hand of the u.s. president. late today the british parliament to be the step of saying no to prime minister it will not support british participation in a military strike against syria. the fierce response wasn't just a surprise, it was nearly unprecedented to a pettish leader seeking to support his american ally. >> the origin question was the motion on syria, and the use of chemical weaponed as published in corrected form, since when an amendment ha
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
was an intern at bank of america in london, worked eight all-nighers in two weeks. we have more. >> the signs were there, but for the student, it was too late. the young student from germany was nearing the end of his internship at bank of america's investment on merle lunch when he died at his home. he had reportedly just worked 72 hours when he collapsed in the shower. his profile on a social media website had an ambitious streak, a pressure to outdo a fellow worker for a position. >> those individuals are so driven, so key to get a job, that they push themselves and in the end, push themselves over the edge. it's up to the leader of the team to see what's happening and even if these individuals keep volunteering for work, which some of them will do, to turn around and say no, you've done enough, you node to go and have some rest. >> an internship at a high pro tile company is seen as a valuable recruitment doing, putting pressure on interns to accel. many say interns do work punishing schedules in the banking industry, offering a glimpse of what's to item if they gain employment in the pro
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
security fellow with new america foundation, thank you so much for joining us this morning. as the quest considers how to respond, disturbing new images. this is video of what is said to be a fire bomb attack near a school in the northwestern part of syria. it may have contained may palm that sticks to the skin and causes severe burns. a doctor says at least seven people were killed and dozens were injuries. al jazeera cannot independently confirm those reports. >> asaad's regime has plameed the august 21st chemical attack on rebels. on friday, the syrian government called the u.s. intelligence on the use of chemical weapons fabrication and lies. keep it here to al jazeera for continuing coverage on the crisis in syria, you can also stay up to date on our website aljazeera.com. children in unmarked graves may finally have their stories told. exhume makeses are underway in an attempt to uncover their long held secrets. beautiful weather in yosemite national park, we will tell you why that sunshine is not helping firefighters dealing with a run away wild fire burning the national treasure.
in the united states of america. i'm going to to be focused on that particular issue. right now what i needed to do is to make sure schools on on time and safely. not withstand something of the personnel reductions. the focus has to be on education, young people, what goes on in school, after school, on the weekends, during the summer, and so we beefed up many of our after-school programs as well as summer programming to make sure our kids are safe and they are learning and they are working with caring, nurturing adults. >> okay. mayor landrieu, i want to get this school question out of the way as well. i want to talk about -- specifically about other things. i want to ask the same question. as new orleans is building a new prison, is this our new reality? giving up on schools to make room for teens who will inevitably end up behind bars? >> you know, it is one of the things that we face in this nation. we are bogey to have cadillac prisons and not have schools that work. we have to get priorities right. you are never getting to the issue and mayor nutter and i want to talk about tonight. whi
defined by what you lost, by what you can't do. you've inspired america with what you can do. maybe you lost your sight but you can still see the truth that our disabled veterans make extraordinary contributions to our country every single day. maybe you lost an arm but you still have the strength to pick up a friend or neighbor in need. maybe you lost a leg but you still stand tall for the values and freedoms that make america the greatest nation on earth. [ applause ] i think of the wounded warrior who spoke for so many of you when he said your life will never be the same but that doesn't mean you can't go on to do amaze things with the second thing you've given. i think of wounded veterans across america and how they used that second chance. volunteering in communities. building home, being a mentor to local kids, showing up after tornadoes, after hurricane sandy to help folks rebuild. i think of the wounded warriors who reached out to the survivors of the boston marathon bombing with a simple message, we stand with you. i think of all the inspiring wounded warriors that michelle and
to the role that america has played in that region for a long time. now, it's important that people know that, to get your point, because it's important for people understand what we're doing, why we're doing it, to understand first of all that our alliances are strong and we stand behind our alliances. second, that we are not picking a fight with anyone. we are not trying to militarize a situation there. we would like what has been happening in decades past to keep going. democracy has been spreading across -- prosperity has been spreading to a huge economic and political development and a part of world without any conflict at all. so that's the fight that we have on the pivot and that's why we're doing it and that's why we're saying what we're doing. nobody it's the wrong idea by the duty provided the of why we're doing it spent we only had a couple of minutes left and mechanical of our time because the to the invoke year is they put us on planes and send us back. we will take two questions. kimberly and no here. we'll take a cu key and then you can pick which one you're answering. >> you m
. it drives discussion across america. >>al jazeera america social media community, on tv and online. >>this is your outlet for those conversations. >>post, upload, and interact. >>every night, share undiscovered stories. [♪ music ] >> it's good to have you with us. here is a look at the top stories from around the world. japanese nuclear officials have visited the fukushima power plant to inspect a tank that is thought to be leaking radioactive water. officials at the plant have admitted that 300 tons of water has leaked from the facility. >>> i didn't want's deposed president hosni mubarak is in the hospital after being released from prison. there are large protests planned after friday prayers. >>> and chemical weapons used in syria could be seen as crimes against civilians innage alleged gas attack. >>> the number of children who are fled the war has now reached a million. ten thousand children have crossed into northern iraq. the region has become the largest growing refugee camp in the world. we're in northern iraq where many syrians have found refuge. tell us about the conditions th
can't be discouraged by what is, we've got to keep pushing for what ought to be. the america we ought to leave to our children, mindful that the hardships we face are nothing compared to those dr. king and his fellow marchers faced 50 years ago and that if we maintain our faith in ourselves and in the possibilities of this nation, there is no challenge we cannot surmount. >> joining me today, distinguished senior fellow, bob herbert, contributing editor for "rolling stone" and visiting scholar at nyu, eric bates. and congressional reporter, sahil kapur. joining me from washington is nbc justice correspondent pete williams. pete, you talked recently about the march on washington. why don't you tell us about that. >> reporter: washington, d.c., in the summer of 1963 was more than a little nervous about the prospect of a big civil rights march coming to the city, and that worry extended from the president on down, a fear that if it went badly, it could derail the efforts to pass the nation's most important civil rights law. ♪ it's easy to see now why the march on washington is celebrat
.s. not having an international mandate and the u.s. having to explain all this to voters in america and people around the world. you can sense that there is a new nervousness here. it seems as though they are opening up and realizing the fact that it's not really a question of if anymore but when. that's causing the talk at least amongst some syrian officials. the mood changed considerably here on the ground, piers. >> now cnn obtained this exclusive video by a direct hit from the chemical weapons attack. some of this video is graphic and disturbing. tell us, the latest mood, i guess, that people want to sense is what is president assad's reaction likely to be? >> reporter: that's a very good question. it's probably doubtful there will be any reaction but a lot will depend on what sort of military action is taken. if it's limited, i doubt there will be reaction. i was here when the israelis struck a big weapons depot and a whole mountain was set on fire for days and there was never really any sort of response, any military response. the syrian government knows well that it's air force is no ma
were carried out by the rebels. why? well, to drag america and britain and france into the war, and also quite importantly, to derail any chance of these geneva 2 peace talks. >> the flooded city of in china has been strengthened its dikes to prevent more damage. city 30s have also been building new pairiers along roads to ensure the safety of its main residential areas. much of tonjef has been under water. 33,000 people have been relocated. he sent us this update. >> i'm standing at the moment on a secondary embankment, some several hundreds meters away from where the usual bank is. you can see emergency crews have had to reenforce this area, and what they are doing now, is that some of the wattser making its way to the other side of this bank, not because it is overtopping it but because it has been leaking underneath, where we are now, we have come here by boat and a lot of sandbags are being brought here, so just dropping them over the side, trying to plug any leaks. one of the roads we were driving along just simply ended. about 100-kilometers further downstream from here,
with his sense on however america has come and the work that has been left. ç] >> i have a dream. that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character. i have a dream today. let freedom ring. >> who can forget those words, those words changed a nation 50 years ago today and the message is one that lives on. take a look back now at that message and what really was the mission behind it. in 1963, dr. martin luther king, jr. was arrested and put in jail in birmingham, alabama, the charge, protesting without a permit. there he writes the famous letter from the birmingham jail that was the moral duty to break unjust laws that images of brutality of broadcast around the world, gaining sympathy thought civil rights movement. naacp field operator medgar evers is murdered outside his home. dr. king gives the speech, that famous i have a dream speech. on july 2, 1964, president johnson signs the civil rights act of 1964, which was the most sweeping civil rights legislation since reconstruction. late
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